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09.19: On this day in 1981, Simon and Garfunkel reunited for a concert in New York’s Central Park. It was their first appearance together on stage in 11 years. Just in case you weren't there, don't remember, or have no clue as to exactly how popular these guys were, 750,000 people attended this concert. Three quarters of a million people! Listening to "Mrs. Robinson," "Slip Slidin' Away," and "The Sounds of Silence"! What a strange, strange world we do inhabit.

09.20: On this day in 1973, Jim Croce died in a plane crash, another young casualty on the road of fallen musicians. Croce's working man storyteller style hit a chord in the early '70s, along with his smooth, honest voice, driving "Bad Bad Leroy Brown" and, posthumously, "Time In A Bottle" to the top of the charts.

08.22: Led Zeppelin released their last album of original material, In Through The Out Door, on this day in 1979. Though not exactly a return to their earlier oeuvre, the album did contain some shining moments, such as "South Bound Suarez" and "All My Love."  A year later, drummer John Bonham died after a day of heavy-drinking, and Led Zeppelin disbanded a short time later. Unlike a lot of bands who lose a founding member, Led Zeppelin realized, for reasons both personal and professional, that they did not want to go on as a band. There's always talk of another reunion tour, as they've done intermittently since the group's disbandment, but we'll believe it when we see it. We're just happy for the music they created and left for our hungry ears to devour. Rock on, fellas. Rock on.

08.15: On this day in 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair kicked off for 500,000 attendees in Bethel, New York. A defining moment of the ‘60s, this event, in retrospect, marked the culmination of the “love” generation’s hippy/peace movement. For three days, all was well and the world celebrated and watched in awe as so many people gathered together, listened to some of the best musicians of the decade, and caused so little trouble. The performers included a who's who of '60s music icons, including The Band, Joe Cocker, Richie Havens, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and a festival-capping, stunning rendition of The Star Spangled Banner by the inimitable Jimi Hendrix. It give us chills every time we watch it.

07.18: This day in 1953 saw one of the greatest performers of all time record his first songs, which he paid for himself ($3.98, thank you very much), when an 18-year-old Elvis Presley walked through the doors of Sun Records (née Memphis Recording Service) and laid down the tracks for two songs,  "That's When Your Heartaches Begin" and "My Happiness," that were, supposedly, recorded for his beloved mom. Sam Phillips' assistant took note of the young singer, suggesting to her boss that Elvis might be the voice of the new sound Sam was looking to foist upon white teens. That is, rock and roll, an entirely new genre back then, up to that time only performed by African-American musicians and singers. It took a good year from the time Elvis recorded that first vanity record until he quit his job as a truck driver to pursue singing full-time, but that first record began a ride that wouldn't end until his death in 1977. Long live the King!

05.30: On this day in 1987, Ireland took over the US charts. U2 was No. 1 with “With or Without You” and Chris de Burgh scored one for every guy that’s met some girl at a bar and woke up the next morning wondering why she was in his bed with “Lady in Red”. Two very different songs, yet both of the '80s. Can you guess which one is our more favoritist? Yeah, we're big on that Bono guy. He's dreamy.

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