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09.05: Aerosmith didn’t miss a thing on this day in 1998 when the biggest hit of their career, their one and only #1 song, hit the top of the charts and remained there for four weeks. Can you guess which song it was? If you guessed “Sweet Emotion,” you are a loser. Yes, "I Don't Want To Miss A Thing" is cheesy and shmaltzy and over the top, but if it brings even a few more people into Aerosmith's realm of rock and roll, then that's okay. If a fan of this song happens to discover "Sweet Emotion" or "Dream On" or "Rag Doll," then we'll accept all of its cheese and shmaltz and over-the-top theatrics. But we will not listen to it because it will be stuck in our heads for days. Too late. Damn.

08.01: On this day in 1960, Carlton Douglas Ridenhour joined us, and the world of music would never be the same. Better known as Chuck D, founding member of one of the best groups ever, Public Enemy, he helped move music forward into territories that hadn't been breached since the heyday of '60s protest songs. By taking his anger at the status-quo and injecting it into hip-hop, Chuck, along with integral producers The Bomb Squad, DJ Terminator X, and sidekick/foil Flavor Flav, took the world by storm. Contrary to what some believe, Public Enemy was not gangster rap, but was, instead, highly political and highly motivated to better their community and themselves. Chuck D rocks. Hard. The man is one of our personal heroes and "Welcome To The Terrordome" is one of the hardest things our ears have ever heard. His and his group's influence on music, not just hip-hop, can be heard in the songs of metal-hop pioneers Rage Against The Machine, slam poet Saul Williams, insanely talented hip-hop band The Roots, and pioneering SoCal punk band NOFX. Happy birthday, Chuck!

07.18: This day in 1953 saw one of the greatest performers of all time record his first songs, which he paid for himself ($3.98, thank you very much), when an 18-year-old Elvis Presley walked through the doors of Sun Records (née Memphis Recording Service) and laid down the tracks for two songs,  "That's When Your Heartaches Begin" and "My Happiness," that were, supposedly, recorded for his beloved mom. Sam Phillips' assistant took note of the young singer, suggesting to her boss that Elvis might be the voice of the new sound Sam was looking to foist upon white teens. That is, rock and roll, an entirely new genre back then, up to that time only performed by African-American musicians and singers. It took a good year from the time Elvis recorded that first vanity record until he quit his job as a truck driver to pursue singing full-time, but that first record began a ride that wouldn't end until his death in 1977. Long live the King!

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